Truckers in Georgia may remember how the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance held its annual inspection spree, the International Roadcheck, in June. The three-day event took place across North America and resulted in 67,502 inspections. Commercial truck and bus drivers were stopped at random for vehicle- and driver-related safety compliance. 45,400 of the inspections were Level I inspections: the most comprehensive possible.

In all, 11,897 vehicles and 2,664 drivers were ordered out of service for violations. The top three vehicle-related violations were brake system (28.4 percent), tire and wheel (19.1 percent) and brake adjustment violations (16.3 percent). 21.6 percent of trucks that underwent a Level I inspection were issued out-of-service orders.

3.9 percent of drivers who underwent a Level I, II or III inspection were similarly placed out of service. Hours-of-service violations made up 43.7 percent of driver out-of-service violations. With the electronic logging device mandate going into effect, HOS compliance was naturally the focus of this year’s roadcheck. However, less than 2 percent of drivers were put out of service for hours violations.

Other frequent driver-related violations included having the wrong class of license (21.4 percent) and falsifying the record of duty status (10.1 percent). Overall, the 2018 roadcheck ended with more inspections being conducted than in the previous year; at the same time, fewer out-of-service violations were issued.

While that can be seen as an improvement, trucker negligence continues to be a major issue. When a trucking accident occurs because the trucker was negligent or the truck itself did not meet safety standards, victims may have the grounds for a claim. A successful claim may cover medical expenses, vehicle damage, lost income and more. If the accident was fatal, an eligible dependent might file a wrongful death suit. In either case, it may be helpful to hire a lawyer, especially when it comes time to negotiate.