Drugged driving is becoming more and more of a problem for a variety of reasons. An opioid crisis is sweeping the country, with annual increases in amphetamine, marijuana, and heroin use among workers. Another reason is the legalization of marijuana in many jurisdictions. Georgia motorists will want to know, then, about a summit that will take place on March 15 that will address this issue.

The summit is being hosted by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, a division of the U.S. Department of Transportation. It will bring together various key stakeholders, including state and local officials, law enforcement, drug experts and toxicologists, data experts, and safety professionals, and engage in a dialogue about solving the driving under the influence of drugs crisis that has led to many serious and sometimes fatal motor vehicle accidents.

Not only should current state laws on the subject be better enforced, according to the NHTSA, but also more consistent rules should be developed regarding the testing and measuring of drug impairment levels in drivers. The federal agency additionally points out that current methods for tracking and collecting data on DUID incidents and arrests are inadequate. In addition, the public must become better educated about the crisis.

When car crashes are caused by a person who was driving under the influence of drugs or alcohol, the driver’s passengers as well as occupants of other vehicles that are involved in the collision often suffer catastrophic injuries that necessitate expensive medical care. These victims might want to have the help of an attorney when seeking appropriate compensation for their losses.